The St. Regis Chicago (Vista Tower)


The St. Regis Chicago is now the third tallest building on the Chicago skyline.

Location
Chicago, IL

Status
Under construction

Client
Magellan Development Group

Type
Residential, Hotel

Size
1,900,000 sf / 1,196 ft / 101 stories
393 condominiums and 192 hotel rooms

Sustainability
Targeting LEED Silver

Tags

Now the third tallest building in the Chicago skyline, the design for The St. Regis Chicago (Vista Tower) asks the question: What if skyscrapers can be porous connectors, rather than barriers, for the public realm? Defining a new edge of the city, the tower tightly knits the downtown Lakeshore East community to its surroundings with unprecedented urban connections and enhanced public access to the Chicago River. Housing condominiums, a 5-star hotel, restaurants, and amenity spaces, the building’s residential and hotel amenities combine at the upper levels to create a vibrant social center.

Looking up from the river and park, the tower presents itself as three interconnected volumes of differing heights. Moving rhythmically in and out of plane, the overall flowing appearance of the building is the result of an alternating geometry between these three volumes. An innovative structural system allows the central volume to be lifted from the ground plane, creating a new essential pedestrian connection between the Chicago Riverwalk and the nearby community park’s outdoor recreational facilities.

The essential “building block” of the architecture is a 12-story truncated pyramid called a frustum. Stacked and nested, right-side up and upside-down, the frustums to form the tower’s flowing volumes. The unique geometry creates a tall building with eight corners instead of four, providing inhabitants with daylight and fresh air from multiple orientations, while also allocating green space atop the building’s various heights.

Wanda Vista Tower

Reinforcing the tower’s flowing appearance is a gradient of high-performance glass that has been optimized for solar performance according to the variations in floorplate size. To create the building’s stepped edges, “walking columns” align to the outer corners of the floor plates as they step in and out across the frustums (visible here, during construction).

Consultant Team

bKL Architecture, architect of record

Gensler, hotel architect

HBA, interior architect

Magnusson Klemencic Associates, structural engineer

dbHMS, MEP design assist

Mackie Consultants, civil engineer

OLIN, landscape architect

CDC, facade consultant

Related

Now

The Wall Street Journal — "A Sculptural Skyscraper for Chicago"

The Wall Street Journal — "A Sculptural Skyscraper for Chicago"

Architecture Critic Michael Lewis calls The St. Regis Chicago "easily the most important addition to the Chicago skyline in a generation—no small feat in America’s most celebrated architectural city."

Read More

Now

Chicago Magazine — “Between Water and Sky”

Chicago Magazine — “Between Water and Sky”

"Soaring from the river’s edge, Jeanne Gang’s St. Regis Chicago is one of the most significant additions to the skyline in a generation."

Now

Chicago Tribune — “An exclusive look at Jeanne Gang’s Vista Tower, now Chicago’s third-tallest building”

Chicago Tribune — “An exclusive look at Jeanne Gang’s Vista Tower, now Chicago’s third-tallest building”

"With its sleek, swelling curves and sophisticated environmental approach, it refreshes Chicago’s historic role in tall building design and charts bold new directions in skyscraper style."

Now

WIRED — “The City-Sculpting Buildings of Chicago’s Biggest Architect”

“Gang is one of those unicorns of architecture: a designer who is not only widely respected for her research, but has, through strategic practicality and an uncanny ability to convince clients to go further than they think they can, crossed the line into building on a large scale.”

Now

Le Moniteur — "Avec la tour Vista, l’architecte Jeanne Gang chahute l’horizon de Chicago"

Le Moniteur — "Avec la tour Vista, l’architecte Jeanne Gang chahute l’horizon de Chicago"

"Sur les bords du lac Michigan, aux Etats-Unis, l’édifice qui culmine à 363 m sera livré l’année prochaine. La tour, qui sera la troisième plus haute de Chicago, soigne aussi son rapport au sol. L’édifice se soulève en son centre pour libérer un passage pour les promeneurs."